Regional report - Advancing the Social Dimension in South East Europe

The report can be downloaded here (.doc format).

Significant reforms of higher education in South East Europe began in the last decade, with countries from the region entering the Bologna process. Time and manner in which these reforms are being implemented in Southeast Europe can provide a framework for quality and fully accessible higher education to underrepresented groups, including students with disabilities. Serbia, Montenegro and Macedonia have implemented a variety of policies for support to certain groups of students, such as students with disabilities, but have not yet developed a national strategy for the improvement of the social dimension of the Bologna process, as has been recommended by the Working Group on the Social Dimension after a meeting of the ministers responsible for higher education in Bergen.

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Disability is a matter of human rights

The analysis of findings gathered in this research can be found in the publication ‘Disability is a matter of human rights’ published by the Association of Students with Disabilities in 2006 and can be downloaded in either .doc or .pdf format.

The survey was conducted by the Association of Students with Disabilities among persons with disabilities in the period from November 2005 to February 2006.

The aim of this research was to look into experiences and personal attitudes of persons with disabilities regarding discrimination based on a disability and the fight against discrimination through various forms of legal aid.

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The impact of current reforms in higher education on studies and quality of academic life of students with disabilities

Within the project 'Improving the social dimension of the European higher education area in South East Europe' the Association of Students with Disabilities with partner organisations from Macedonia and Montenegro is conducting a research on the impact of current reforms on studies and quality of academic life of students with disabilities.

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